Three Unusual Venezuelan Photographs

Last week was an interesting one for our collection since we found three new images of Venezuela. A rare occurrence…

The first one is a signed and captioned photograph on gelatin printing-out paper by the first Venezuelan photojournalist, Henrique Avril. The photo portrays a homeless family as a consequence of the civil war in 1903. We haven’t been able to find many signed, original photographs by him; we’ve mostly found reproductions of his photographs when they were published in the magazine “El Cojo Ilustrado”. Nevertheless, we are aware that the National Library of Venezuela and the Boulton Foundation have photographs by Avril but we have yet to verify if they are signed or not. Do you know of any other institutions that have original work by Avril?

Familia desamparada. Consecuencias de la guerra. 1903. Foto Avril.

Familia desamparada. Consecuencias de la guerra. 1903. Foto Avril.

The second one in an anonymous stereoscope of the Universidad de Caracas (nowadays the Universidad Central de Venezuela) in 1896, which had established itself in the Convent of San Francisco. After the university relocated to a new campus in 1952, the building became home to the National Academies, or the Palacio de las Academias.

Universidad Central de Venezuela, 1896, Caracas. El Convento de San Francisco fue objeto de una reparación y se convirtió en el Palacio de las Academias.

Universidad Central de Venezuela, 1896, Caracas. El Convento de San Francisco fue objeto de una reparación y se convirtió en el Palacio de las Academias. Photographer unknown.

Of the third, we don’t know much. It is an albumen print of the Morillo Bridge in Valencia. We know it was taken before 1886 because that’s when the tramway construction began, and there is no trace of it anywhere.

Puente Morillo, Valencia, Venezuela.

Puente Morillo, Valencia, Venezuela. Photographer unknown.

If you have any information about any of these photographs, we would love to hear from you.

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